Craig S. Karriker, DMD, P.A.- 400 South Granard Street, Gaffney, SC 29341, (864) 487-0710

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Posts for: October, 2015

By Craig S. Karriker, DMD, PA
October 27, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
3QuestionstoAnswerBeforeYourSmileMakeover

Transforming your smile can be a huge undertaking. And while we have the technical skills, experience and understanding of aesthetics to perform a smile makeover, your input is just as necessary to achieve a satisfying result.

Your part really has to do with expectations — what do you see when you look in the mirror — and what do you want to change?

Here are 3 questions to help guide you in shaping your expectations for that new, beautiful smile.

What do you dislike about your teeth? This is really about specifics and not just a general feeling of dissatisfaction. Are your teeth misshapen, chipped or missing? Are they discolored or stained? Is the spacing off or do you have a poor bite (malocclusion)? Getting a sense of what you perceive as unattractive will help us formulate a plan to improve the appearance of those problem areas.

Are you concerned with how much your gums show when you smile? Your teeth may be perfect, but if your gums seem to steal the spotlight when you smile (known as a “gummy” smile), you may need some remedy like veneers, crowns or even corrective surgery. Which procedure depends on whether the crowns of your teeth are too short in proportion to the gums, or the muscles in your upper lip are allowing the lip to rise too high when you smile. A dental examination will tell all.

Do you want a “Hollywood Smile” — or just a more attractive, natural you? Smile makeovers aren’t just about clinical alterations — it’s just as much about your personal perceptions of beauty. Some patients want the perfectly shaped, aligned and dazzlingly white smile that’s the epitome of Hollywood. Others want only to enhance their smile, perhaps even keeping a few unique imperfections they’re comfortable with. It’s important to know which person you are, and to communicate that with us when we’re putting together your makeover plan.

Changing your smile is a big step in your life. You can help make the process more satisfying and successful if you understand what you want to change — and why.

If you would like more information on smile analysis and makeover, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Great Expectations.”


By Craig S. Karriker, DMD, PA
October 19, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: gum recession  
YouMayNeedSurgerytoRepairtheDamageofGumRecession

Gum recession is an all too common problem for millions of people that if left untreated could lead to tooth and bone loss. But the good news is not only can the process be stopped, much of the damage can also be repaired through periodontal plastic surgery.

Gum recession occurs when the gum tissue protecting the teeth detaches and draws back to expose the root surface. This exposure may result in a range of effects, from minor tooth sensitivity to eventual tooth loss. There are a number of causes for gum recession, including overaggressive brushing or flossing, biting habits or badly fitting dentures or appliances.

The most prominent cause, though, is periodontal (gum) disease, a bacterial infection triggered by plaque buildup on tooth surfaces due to poor oral hygiene. Fortunately, early gum disease is highly treatable by thoroughly cleaning tooth, root and gum surfaces of plaque and calculus (hardened plaque deposits), along with possible antibiotic therapy, to reduce the infection and promote tissue healing.

Unfortunately, advanced cases of gum recession may have already resulted in extensive damage to the tissues themselves. While disease treatment can stimulate some re-growth, some cases may require reconstructive surgery to repair and further rebuild the tissues.

There are several techniques periodontists (specialists in gums, bone and other dental support structures) or dentists with advanced training can perform to “re-model” recessed gum tissues. One of the major areas is placing tissue grafts (either from the patient or a human donor) at the site to encourage further tissue growth. Properly affixing a graft requires a great deal of training, skill and experience, especially in cases where the graft may need to be connected with adjoining tissues to establish a viable blood supply for the graft.

In skilled hands, a periodontal surgical procedure is fairly predictable with minimal discomfort afterward. And the lasting effects are well-worth it — not only will your health benefit from restored gum tissue and greater protection for your teeth, you’ll also enjoy a more attractive smile.

If you would like more information the treatment of gum recession, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Periodontal Plastic Surgery.”


By Craig S. Karriker, DMD, PA
October 18, 2015
Category: Oral Health
Tags: gum disease   diabetes  
DiabeticswithGumDiseaseBenefitfromCoordinatingTreatmentforBoth

If you have periodontal (gum) disease, you probably already know you’re in danger of eventual tooth and bone loss if the infection isn’t brought under control. But if you also have diabetes, the effects from gum disease could extend well beyond your mouth.

Gum disease is a bacterial infection caused by plaque, a film of food remnant that builds up on tooth surfaces mainly due to poor oral hygiene. As the infection grows, your body’s immune system responds by flooding your gum tissues with antibodies to fight it, resulting in inflammation. As the inflammation persists, though, it damages the gum and underlying bone tissue, which in turn leads to gum and bone loss from the teeth.

Diabetes also causes an inflammatory response within the body. The disease develops either as a result of the body’s decreased ability to produce insulin to balance the glucose (sugar) levels in the bloodstream (Type 1) or the body develops a resistance to insulin’s effects (Type 2). As a result diabetics experience abnormally high blood glucose levels, a condition called hyperglycemia. This triggers chronic inflammation that can lead to inhibited wound healing, increased risk of heart, kidney or eye disease, coma or death.

Gum disease can worsen diabetic inflammation, and vice versa. The effects of the oral infection add to the body’s already overloaded response to diabetes. In turn, the immune system is already compromised due to diabetes, which can then increase the severity of the gum disease.

Research and experience, though, have found that pursuing treatment and disease management for either condition has a positive effect on managing the other. Treating gum disease through plaque removal, antibiotic therapy, surgery (if needed) and renewed oral hygiene will diminish the oral infection and reduce the body’s immune response. Caring for diabetes through medication, diet, exercise and lifestyle changes like quitting smoking will in turn contribute to a quicker healing process for infected gum tissues.

Treating gum disease when you have diabetes calls for a coordinated approach on both fronts. By caring for both conditions you’ll have a more positive effect on your overall health.

If you would like more information on the relationship between diabetes and gum disease, please contact us to schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Craig S. Karriker, DMD, PA
October 10, 2015
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: fillings  
Tooth-ColoredFillingsProvideaViableAlternativetoDentalAmalgam

For over a hundred years dental amalgam — a combination of silver, mercury, tin and other metals — has been an effective filling material for teeth damaged by decay. But it has one major drawback — its metallic appearance stands out in stark contrast to the natural color of teeth.

As an alternative, composite resin fillings can match the color, shape and texture of natural teeth. These materials and the techniques used to bond them are proving just as effective as and more aesthetically pleasing than dental amalgam.

Fillings help protect and preserve a decayed tooth. By first removing decayed tooth structure through drilling, the resulting void is filled with durable material that strengthens the tooth and provides it protection from further decay.

The ultimate goal for restoration is to return the tooth to as near normal form and function as possible. Dental amalgam serves well in terms of function, providing the tooth strength in the face of the daily biting forces it encounters. In contrast, composite resins excel in appearance, but haven’t always matched the durability of amalgam. They’re material construction has improved over time, though, as well as the techniques used to bond them to teeth.

Most of these bonding techniques incorporate layering. The first step is to seal the dentin (the porous, living tissue just below the enamel); we then build up the composite material layer by layer within the tooth using special bonding adhesive and curing lights. In some cases where a large volume of tooth structure must be replaced, the restoration is first formed on the tooth and then removed for curing before being cemented into the tooth or a separate restoration is formed by a dental lab.

The end result is a tooth which both looks and functions like a fully intact tooth. Though care must be taken not to subject composite resin restorations to undue forces (no cracking open nutshells, for example), your new filling should continue to serve you and look great for a long time to come.

If you would like more information on metal-free restorations, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “The Natural Beauty of Tooth Colored Fillings.”


PreventiveCareforYourChildisaPartnershipbetweenYouandYourDentist

Like the rest of their bodies, children’s teeth and mouth are on a rapid development track. By the time they’re young adults, they will have had two sets of teeth, extensive bone growth and a noticeable change in their features. The natural process is truly amazing.

But dental disease can easily derail their development, with tooth decay the most common problem children encounter. More than at any other time of life, preventive dental care is a top priority.

True preventive care for your child includes the entire mouth, not just the teeth. Our main focus, of course, is to head off tooth decay before it develops, including the application of topical fluoride or sealants when appropriate. But we also monitor bite development and provide protection against sports injuries or other forms of trauma with customized mouth guards.

You also have a part to play in your child’s preventive dental care. It begins when your child’s first teeth begin to emerge in the mouth — the point when you should begin brushing them. You can also reduce the risk of dental disease by providing a nutritious diet that’s high in fresh fruits and vegetables and low in sugar, especially between-meal snacks.

You should also start regular dental visits around their first birthday. This is not only the best time to begin professional care, but your child will also have an easier time at this age becoming comfortable with visiting the dentist than waiting until they’re older.

Taking care of your child’s teeth is a working partnership between you and us: we provide the professional care your child needs to develop properly, while you look to their daily hygiene and nutrition, which is just as important for your child’s healthy development. Through our partnership, we can ensure your child is getting the very best start toward a lifetime of healthy teeth and gums.

If you would like more information on preventive dental care for your child, please contact us today to schedule an appointment for a consultation.